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Rebecca Noble

Director of Business Development

Rebecca joined thinkbaby™ shortly after its inception. It was an obvious move with her background and personal interests. Over the past decade, Rebecca has assisted in clinical research and community outreach projects related to environmental exposures. While working at the University of Texas Medical Branch, Department of Preventive Medicine, Division of Environmental Toxicology, she worked on several studies including some with the late Dr. Marvin Legator, a leader in the field of environmental toxicology. One study showed children taking methylphenidate (the generic name for a class of drugs to treat ADHD) had an increase in chromosomal abnormalities. Another study showed the baby teeth of children with autism had higher levels of mercury versus controls. In the private sector, she prepared reports on an extensive number of environmental issues, including the effects of exposure to endocrine disruptors. Throughout, Rebecca has been dedicated to helping others have access to information on health and environmental issues, especially how to make safer choices for oneself, family, and the environment. She is excited to play an important role with thinkbaby™ to offer safe alternatives that are free of toxic chemicals.

Tell us about any research you have completed relating to children’s health.

Prior to joining thinkbaby, I assisted in clinical research and community outreach projects related to environmental exposures. While working at the University of Texas Medical Branch, Department of Preventive Medicine, Division of Environmental Toxicology, I worked on several studies including some with the late Dr. Marvin Legator, a leader in the field of environmental toxicology. One study showed children taking methylphenidate (the generic name for a class of drugs to treat ADHD) had an increase in chromosomal abnormalities. Another study showed the baby teeth of children with autism had higher levels of mercury versus controls. In the private sector, I prepared reports on an extensive number of environmental issues, including the effects of exposure to endocrine disruptors.

What do you find motivating about working with thinkbaby and thinksport?

I have been working with thinkbaby and thinksport since 2007 and I don’t view it as a job because it is has been such a great opportunity for me to make a positive contribution to the world. When Kevin told me about his plans to create a solution after the frustrations of trying to get major companies to switch to safer practices, I felt hopeful and inspired. It was tough creating and building the company without the huge budgets of the big guys, but I watched as Kevin stuck with what was important- making sure we were creating safe products that adhered to the strictest guidelines for safety, as well as innovative design elements and pocket-friendly pricing. Then I watched a community grow of people who were concerned about what was in their products and keeping their families safe and they started changing the market by opting to buy products that didn’t contain toxic chemicals. Thinkbaby and thinksport offered a solution and consumers chose us. Then, the big companies began to change to keep up with the new standards that I feel we played a role in establishing. We might not be a huge company, but I think helping evolve the market to offer more safe solutions is the biggest marker of success. We are a small company but our passion and motivation is huge.

How is thinkbaby a family company?

Another important aspect of thinkbaby is that it is a family company. The founder, Kevin, is my brother.